We just updated the layout so if looks off, clear your cache or refresh the page with Ctrl+F5

List Price US $699
Rossignol Savory 7 Ski Review
Approx. Weight Feels Light
Skier Level Intermediate - Expert
Ski Style All-Mountain
Ski Width Wide
Ski Shape Directional Twin
Camber Profile Rocker/Camber/Rocker
Core Material Paulownia Wood
Turning Radius 17m
Manufactured in
Powder Great
Carving Average
Speed Good
Uneven Terrain Good
Switch Good
Moguls Good
Trees Good
Jumps Average
Jibbing Poor
Pipe Poor
On Snow Feel

Semi-Stable

Turn Initiation

Easy

Flex

Medium/Stiff

Edge Hold

Med/Soft Snow

Versatility

Moderate

Playfulness

Moderate

Rossignol Savory 7 2015 Review by A Better Ski

The Rossignol Savory 7 is the new version of the popular S7 W, the women’s all mountain freeride ski that was one of the industries most acclaimed skis. Rossignol lists this ski as 80% powder and 20% all-mountain. The Rossignol Savory 7 is better suited to the soft snow, but it has an all-around versatility that many people will enjoy.

Size: 178

Days: 1

Conditions: Powder, Crud, Soft Snow, Hard Pack, Groomers

Boots: Rossignol Electra Sensor3 90

Bindings: Rossignol Axial3 120

On the Snow Feel: The Rossignol Savory 7 has rocker in the tip and tail and 50% camber underfoot. Camber underfoot helps give the ski more stability, but with a significant amount of rocker in tip and tail the savory 7 can be quite playful, especially in the deeper snow.

Powder: The Savory 7 is built for the soft snow and deep powder. With 106mm waist, and a good amount of early rise in the tip, the ski has a good amount of flotation in the deep snow. It’s not necessarily a powder specialist, and you’re going to use the Savory 7 for other parts of the mountain, but if you don’t want a separate powder ski just for the deep days, the savory 7 is a great option.

Turn Initiation and Carving: The Rossignol Savory 7 is a light-weight ski with a honeycomb tip/tail and light paulownia wood core. The tip and tail are tapered, and when combined with the honeycomb construction it really reduces the swing-weight allowing the ski to turn with ease.  Overall the ski is quite forgiving, and it is pretty easy to get up on edge. The ski has a relatively short effective edge, but it flexes well, and offers some decent rebound and pop from edge to edge. It’s not as responsive as a stiff race ski, but it was quite easy to make quick short radius turns.

Speed: The Rossignol Savory 7 isn’t necessarily built for speed, but it does a pretty decent job when going fast. The light-weight honeycomb tip is relatively stiff for its weight, helping to keep tip chatter to a minimum. With 50% camber underfoot and a 106mm waist, the Savory 7 offers a decently stable platform. In addition the light-weight paulownia wood core helps to reduce vibration and does a nice job of keeping the ski damp. It’s not as good at speed as the heavier/beefier Blizzard Samba, but for a ski this good in powder (lighter w/ softer flex) it does a good job at speed.

Uneven Terrain: The Rossignol Savory 7 does a good job in the uneven terrain. It is a light ski with a bit softer flex, but it has a wide shovel and stable platform underneath. When you hit the crud, or chopped up snow, the Savory 7 does a decent job of keeping you on top of the snow. If you are a skier that really likes to plow through the crud and stay super stable, the savory 7 may not be the best option, but for skiers who like a little more playfulness, and you like to bounce around on the crud, the savory 7 is a good option.

Edge Hold: The Rossignol Savory 7 does have 50% camber underneath helping to keep the ski stable, but the effective edge length of the Savory 7 is relatively small. When on soft snow, the ski feels stable and edge hold good, but the ski loses a lot of edge hold on the hard snow.

Flex: The Savory 7 is pretty stiff underfoot, with softer tips and tail. This helps it to float better in the powder, but gives a little stability on the groomers and hard pack.

Switch: The Savory 7 can ride switch, but it’s a directional twin that is happier going forward.

Jumps: The Rossignol Savory 7 can be used as in the park, but it is definitely more of an all-mountain ski than park ski. If you use it to jump, you will appreciate its flex and wide platform for landing.

Park: Not the best pipe ski.

The Rossignol Savory 7 is a great ski for those who want a versatile all-mountain ski but spend more of their time in the soft snow and powder than hard pack groomers. The 106mm waist, and significant tip/tail rocker gives good floatation in powder, but it also decreases the effective edge, making the ski less stable on the groomers. It’s a playful ski in the soft snow, and it’s quite forgiving on edge. If you mainly ski soft snow, it’s hard to go wrong with the Rossignol Savory 7, but if you spend a lot of time on the hard snow, you will be left wanting something with a better edge hold.

 
Rossignol Savory 7 Specs

 
Rossignol Savory 7 Images

We try to get as many images of the Rossignol Savory 7, but forgive us if they're not all there.

2015

 
Rossignol Company Information

Rossignol Savory 7 User Reviews

Click here to submit your review.


Submit your review
* Required Field