Price US $749

Rossignol Experience 100 Ski Review

Rossignol Experience 100 2016 - 2015 Review by A Better Ski

The Rossignol Experience 100 is back unchanged for 2016. It is still a powerful all mountain ski with good versatility. It’s perfect for those that like to rip the frontside groomers at speed, but also like to venture off piste from time to time. It’s quite a bit stiffer (and less forgiving) than the Rossignol Experience 88, and requires a bit more aggressive style of skiing. Although it lacks a bit of soft snow performance, it makes up for it with its powerful rebound and solid edge hold. Both of which are matched by its stability at high speeds.

2016 Rossignol Experience 100 On Mountain Video Ski Review

Size: 182

Days: 1

Riders: Matt and Brian

Conditions: Groomers, Hard Pack, Soft Chop (5”), Bumps

Boots: Rossignol Alias Sensor 120

Bindings: Rossignol Axial3 120 B100

On the Snow Feel: The Rossignol Experience 100 feels quite locked in on the groomers and hard snow. You are able to break them free, but it does take ab it of work. They still offer a lot of versatility, but do require a bit more aggressive skier.

Powder: The Rossignol Experience 100 has an Auto Turn Rocker profile, and Air Tip tech (Same as in the Rossignol Experience 88). Both help with soft snow maneuverability, and with a wider platform than the 88, and we expected the float to be a bit better. The wide light-weight shovel of the 100 does help the ski to plane quickly, and with a neutral or backseat stance the skis were able to float okay, but with a forward stance we noticed a bit more tip dive. We also noticed that the stiff tails did nothing to help with maneuverability, and although the ski was okay riding in the powder, we didn’t have the same control you find in more powder friendly skis. The 100 isn’t terrible in the powder, but there are skis in this category with much better float. This is a bit more of a directional charger than a soft snow ski.

Turn Initiation and Carving: The Rossignol Experience 100 isn’t a dead easy ski to turn, but it rewards good skiers with great edge hold and powerful rebound. The AIR Tip and Auto Turn Rocker do help to increase maneuverability, and at slower speeds it wasn’t terribly difficult to get on edge. At lower edge angles the ski is responsive, but not necessarily fun and energetic. Intermediate and advanced skiers will be able to ski the Experience 100, but it will be much more fun for those who ski aggressively. The large shovel makes it easier to turn the ski, but it still takes a bit of work to bend it into the turn. Once you get it to bend you’ll be treated to a powerful and energetic rebound. It was a lot of fun carving medium to large radius turns at speed. As you increase edge angle, you’re also treated to much better edge hold. This is both a good and bad thing depending on your style. The stiff tail locks you into the turn (much more so than the 88), and it wasn’t easy to scrub speed or vary your turn shape. On the other hand, the ski is much more willing to finish turns with lots of power and energy. I would say the 88 is a still a great carver, but more suited to a less aggressive skier than the 100.

Speed: The Rossignol Experience 100 has a significant amount of camber underfoot. It also has a sandwich construction with two layers of titanal. This makes the ski much more powerful than the 88. It also keeps the ski stable at high speeds. We really enjoyed making medium radius turns at speed, but the ski is more fun when opening things up. It’s stiff construction is ideal for speeding down the mountain. The Air tip also keeps things light enough up front to ensure there is no tip chatter.

Uneven Terrain: Although a decent crud ski, the Rossignol Experience 100 was less at home in these conditions than on the smooth groomers. That’s not to say the Experience 100 isn’t good in crud, but it takes a bit more work. The large shovels didn’t do much to smooth out the terrain, and we found the ride to be more erratic than we anticipated. The stiff flex, and rocker did help the ride, but we found we needed to be a bit more fluid and less aggressive. Taking it a bit slower we found the ski was able to handle the crud well.

Moguls: The Rossignol Experience 100 isn’t an easy ski in the moguls. The powerful tails are not very forgiving, and when on edge are locked in. This isn’t ideal when you need to shut it down quickly, or turn quickly to avoid the next bump. The AIR TIP and rocker profile does help make these skis quicker, but they’re not great in the moguls.

Edge Hold: The same powerful tail that provides power exiting a turn is what keeps these skis locked in on anything from soft to firm. I wouldn’t consider these an ice ski, but they definitely do a great job with the firm snow, especially for a ski that is 100mm underfoot.

The Rossignol Experience 100 is a good all-mountain frontside ski for the aggressive skier that likes to occasionally venture off piste. What it lacks in float and crud performance it makes up for with lively and powerful rebound. It’s powerful, edgy, stable, and damp. It’s not a front-side specialist, but one of the best carvers in the class for aggressive skiers. Those who are a bit lighter or less aggressive may find the 88 a better option. If you like to make powerful medium radius turns on smooth groomers at high speed then you should consider the Rossignol Experience 100.

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Approx. Weight

Feels Normal

Skier Level

Advanced - Expert

Ski Style

All-Mountain

Ski Width

Regular

Ski Shape

Directional

Camber Profile

Rocker/Camber

Core Material

Poplar, Fiberglass, Titanal

Turning Radius

18m

Manufactured in

Imported

On Snow Feel

Locked In

Turn Initiation

Moderate

Flex

Stiff

Edge Hold

Hard Snow

Versatility

Moderate

Playfulness

Some

Powder

Good

Carving

Great

Speed

Great

Uneven Terrain

Good

Switch

Poor

Moguls

Average

Trees

Good

Jumps

Average

Jibbing

Poor

Pipe

Poor