Price US $749

Moment Belafonte Ski Review

Moment Belafonte 2016 - 2015 Review by A Better Ski

The Moment Belafonte is back for 2016 with only minor changes. The ride is still very similar to last season, and is still one of our favorite big mountain skis of the last few years. The thing we loved most about the 2015 and 2016 Belafonte was just how approachable it was for such a burly, big mountain ski.  Don’t get me wrong, the Moment Belafonte is still a fantastic big mountain charger. I just don’t feel like I have to be 200lbs to ski it. This ski loves to charge, but it’s so much more manageable than others in the category. For that we have to say thank you to Moment. Not every aggressive rider is 200lbs and sometimes we lighter skiers want a ski that can rip just as hard as other directional big mountain skis, but don’t take as much work to maneuver. Fear not though, the Moment Belafonte is still plenty of ski for the bigger guys. All were saying is you don’t have to be a big to enjoy it.

2016 Moment Belafonte On Mountain Video Ski Review

Size: 186

Days: 2

Riders: Matt

Conditions: Firm Groomers, Soft Chop (5”), Hard Crud

Boots: Rossignol Alias Sensor 120

Bindings: Marker Jester

On the Snow Feel: The Moment Belafonte is definitely a solid and stable ski underfoot. However, it was also surprisingly easy to maneuver (relative to other big mountain chargers).

Powder: At 106mm underfoot, the Moment Belafonte offers a decent amount of float. It would be capable in deeper snow, but being a directional charger, it’s not the most playful or surfy ski. If you like to ski through the deep snow as fast as you can it will be very capable and fun. On the other hand, those who want a more maneuverable and surfy powder ski, the Belafonte isn’t it. Still I could see this ski being a lot of fun in deeper snow.

Turn Initiation and Carving: The Moment Belafonte is a solid directional big mountain charger that likes to go straight and fast. Surprisingly, it’s still easy to maneuver at slower speeds. I wouldn’t call the Belafonte nimble, but I was pleasantly surprised at how manageable the ski was a slower speed given how substantial the ski is. Of course, it’s still happiest at speed. The Belafonte begs to be pushed down the fall line. It definitely requires a bit of speed to really get it on edge and flex into a turn. Once you do you’ll see just how well the Belafonte rails. The Belafonte has a Triple Camber design that gives the ski plenty of stability, and edge grip. At high speeds and edge angles, the ski really digs in. It was so much fun leaving deep trenches in the snow. The slightly raised tail allows you to release the ski without feeling catchy, and initiation of the next turn is actually quite smooth. The Belafonte is certainly most happy with moderate to long radius turns (25m), but it also feels manageable enough when you get in tighter spaces. It also felt easy to break free when I needed to, and I never felt like I had to sty locked in once I was.

Speed: This ski is built for speed. Although it may not actually have autopilot, it feels like the ski does a lot of the work for you. I’m not saying you don’t need to be on it, but it is way easier to ski than expected. The Belafonte does such a great job of absorbing the terrain, that it can make it feel too easy to go top speed. Beginners beware though; this is not a ski for the faint of heart. It prefers to be driven, and when on high edge angles it leaves deep trenches in the snow. Any mistake when locked in could be costly.

Uneven Terrain: The Moment Belafonte does a great job when snow conditions are questionable at best. The ski has a solid and burly construction with a moderately wide and very stable base. It’s not the best crud busting ski ever, but it definitely instills plenty of confidence to go fast in these conditions. The rocker tip helps to keep you on top, while the stiff flex is substantial enough to blast through. The wider base also helps to better absorb the terrain. Even at eye watering speeds, I never had an issue with tip deflection. As things got a bit deeper, I would take a bit more bases flat approach and try and float over the top rather than blast through. I would say that the Belafonte is excellent in the shallow chop, and still great in the deeper chop.

Edge Hold: When you’re skiing at eye watering speeds it’s important to know that your edges will hold. This is an area where the Belafonte once again delivers. The Triple Camber profile provides plenty of stability and edge hold, and when you really get the ski on a high edge angle, the edge pressure is really quite high. In the soft snow it was really easy to lay down deep trenches, and on the firm snow the Belafonte remains quite stable.

Flex: The Belafonte is a stiff, burly, directional big mountain ski. Although the ski is a touch softer in the tip, it’s still a very stiff ski overall.

Switch: It’s definitely not a playful twin tip ski, but the tail of the Moment Belafonte is slightly raised, allowing you to stomp big switch landings, or ride in reverse when you need to.

Jumps and Park: The Moment Belafonte isn’t the greatest park ski. It has a very stiff flex, and straight sidecut that isn’t ideal for making quick turns or popping of jumps. That being said, the Belafonte is great for big drops or stomping huge airs.

The Moment Belafonte is one of our favorite big mountain skis. It has the straight sidecut, stiff burly construction, and solid dampness we love in a big mountain ski, while still being somewhat approachable and easier to ski. It’s still not a ski for beginners, but light-weight aggressive skiers will love how much more friendly the Moment Belafonte is compared to other heavy damp directional big mountain skis. It loves to make large radius turns at high speed and leave deep trenches even in the firm snow. It mellows out the chop, and makes for a damp and stable ride even if the snow is less than ideal. Although it’s maneuverable for a big ski, it’s still better suited for those who like to rip fast and hard without making a ton of turns down the mountain.

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Approx. Weight

Feels Normal

Skier Level

Advanced - Expert

Ski Style

Big Mountain (Freeride)

Ski Width

Wide

Ski Shape

Directional Twin

Camber Profile

Rocker/Camber

Core Material

Aspen, Ash, Carbon, Fiberglass

Turning Radius

25.5m @ 186cm

Manufactured in

Reno, NV, USA

On Snow Feel

Stable

Turn Initiation

Moderate

Flex

Stiff

Edge Hold

Hard Snow

Versatility

Moderate

Playfulness

Some

Powder

Good

Carving

Good

Speed

Great

Uneven Terrain

Great

Switch

Average

Moguls

Average

Trees

Average

Jumps

Average

Jibbing

Poor

Pipe

Poor