Price US $90

Marmot Exum Guide Undercuff 2015 Review by A Better Ski

At first glance the Marmot Exum Guide looks like a durable and burly glove that would be great for backcountry and mountaineering trips. We haven’t been able to put a lot of mountain time in with the glove, but want to talk a bit about first impressions.

Warmth: The Marmot Exum Guide is lined with a light DriClime layer that feels soft and warm, but without much for insulation, the Marmot Exum Guide isn’t very warm. I think for people that are constantly on the move, or working really hard to earn their turns, the Exum Guide would provide ample warmth, but for cold resort days, you’ll be wishing for extra insulation. I could easily see this becoming my late season glove where temperatures are generally a lot milder, but for mid-winter, bring on the insulated gloves.

Waterproofing: The Marmot Exum Guide has a Marmot MemBrain layer for decent waterproof protection, but I’m not sure I’d rely on these to keep my hands dry in really wet conditions. I feel like a day of light rain, or heavy wet snow would end in these wetting out and my hands being wet and cold. I think they would hold up fine for moderate conditions, and they may just be perfect for bluebird days, but when the rain and wet snow starts coming down, I’ll be reaching for a pair of Gore-Tex gloves.

Breathability: The thing I really like about the Marmot Exum Guide is that has a bit of versatility. It’s warm enough for cold morning ascents, but when the temps start to warm up, your hands won’t feel clammy and wet. The Exum Guide breathes pretty well, and would work well as a mountaineering or backcountry ski glove.

Fit: I found the fit to be true to size. They are quite low profile, but roomy enough to fit my hands pretty well.

Durability: At first glance, the Marmot Exum Guide feels and looks rugged, but I’d be interested to see how they hold up over time. I often find that with leather gloves, the palms, fingers, and back of the hand hold up well, but the seams tend to wear out first. Part of the problem is that leather tends to get a bit stiff when really cold and that puts a bit more pressure on the seams. I don’t think you’ll have to worry about the Marmot Exum Guide getting torn or ripped apart from ski edges, or sharp rocks, but I’d be interested to see how the seams hold up long term.

Other Features: The Marmot Exum Guide has an undercuff design that fits well under a jacket.

While I tend to prefer a gauntlet style cuff in deep powder, the low profile Marmot Exum Guide seems to have superior dexterity. The low profile design also looks good, and feels comfortable. I feel they would be the perfect glove for bluebird backcountry trips, or mild spring days at the resort. They offer great dexterity, and seem relatively durable, and rugged. The only downside is that they don’t provide a lot of warmth, or waterproofing. So, perfect for bluebird days, and not so great when the weather is old and wet.

* Marmot does have an Exum Guide Gauntlet Style glove that we have not been able to test yet. At first glance it looks like a glove that we would prefer over the Exum Guide Undercuff, and probably be a bit better for off-piste resort and backcountry skiers.

Size Worn: L (Hand Circumference: 8.5 Inches, Hand Length: 7.5 Inches)
What I look for in a glove: My hands run really warm, so I like a glove that isn’t too hot! I really love gloves that have removable liners so I can use them together on really cold days, or use just the shell, or just the liner. I also really like to have dexterity when skiing. I don’t necessarily need a glove that allows me to use my phone, or other small electronics, but I definitely want to be able to buckle my boots, zip my jacket, etc…

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